Posted 2 minutes ago

batvvornan:

mightbedog:

batvvornan:

fuck

No swearing I’ll tell god

Plz no mom

Posted 2 minutes ago
Posted 2 minutes ago

gothicgrandpaqueen:

you catch a lot of flies with honey, but you catch more honeys being fly

Posted 3 minutes ago

jaclcfrost:

awesomeartist15:

jaclcfrost:

if someone ever makes me the godparent of their child i’m going to make sure their child grows up referring to me as their fairy godparent and believing that i am their fairy godparent

Will you wear a pointy crown and have a star wand and little fairy wings too?

no of course not don’t be ridiculous

i will have huge fairy wings

Posted 3 minutes ago

xamag-homestuck:

*Can’t stop listening to ‘Do You Remem8er Me’*

Vriska, stop it, I used to hate you.

Posted 4 minutes ago
Posted 4 minutes ago
Posted 7 minutes ago

butmyopinionisright:

that-kid-erin:

when something happens in your fandom but none of your friends are in it 

image

this is my whole life.

This. A thousand times this.

(Source: pornstarch)

Posted 9 minutes ago

last-on-your-lips:

ultrafacts:

For more posts like this, Follow Ultrafacts

THE LAST ONE

Posted 11 minutes ago
generalelectric:

“We have a hunger of the mind which asks for knowledge of all around us, and the more we gain, the more is our desire; the more we see, the more we are capable of seeing.” 
Maria Mitchell is known as the first professional female astronomer in the United States. On October 1, 1847, she peered through her family’s telescope and “swept around for comets,” as she did every night it was clear. But that night she became the first woman in the U.S. to discover one. She later became the first Astronomy professor at Vassar College, where she would often ask her students, “Did you learn that in a book or observe it yourself?” 

generalelectric:

“We have a hunger of the mind which asks for knowledge of all around us, and the more we gain, the more is our desire; the more we see, the more we are capable of seeing.” 

Maria Mitchell is known as the first professional female astronomer in the United States. On October 1, 1847, she peered through her family’s telescope and “swept around for comets,” as she did every night it was clear. But that night she became the first woman in the U.S. to discover one. She later became the first Astronomy professor at Vassar College, where she would often ask her students, “Did you learn that in a book or observe it yourself?”